NFL Combine 2022 Drills: LB Winners and Losers

Photo: Kirby Lee-USA TODAY Sports

NFL SCOUTING COMBINE LB WINNERS AND LOSERS

WINNERS

Troy Andersen, Montana State

An All-American on the offensive side of the football during his time as a Bobcat, Troy Andersen, expectedly, opened eyes, to say the least. A 4.41 40-yard dash for a prospect with the ability to work all over the second level of a defense? Teams in need of an immediate impact linebacker on Day 2 should be pounding the table for him.

Channing Tindall, Georgia

Have. A. Day.

Channing Tindall was explosive in all drills, finishing top five among all LBs in the 40 (4.53), vert (42 inches), and broad (10-foot-9). A physical, downhill linebacker with elite-level athleticism to wrangle down ball-carriers outside the tackles, cover in space, and rush the passer, Tindall made himself some money.

Christian Harris, Alabama

A fleet-footed defender, while Christian Harris’ film wasn’t the cleanest of the LBs eligible in the class, his showing in drills was outstanding. Balanced and calculated in his movements, when you know, you know, and when it comes to Harris, a blend of physicality and movement skills, day two is his strikezone. 

Malcolm Rodriguez, Oklahoma State

An unknown prospect to the majority of the public eye, Malcolm Rodriguez was outstanding in showcasing his athletic profile, backing outstanding measurables up with quick, light feet in drills, constantly working with leverage and a low pad level—a key for the LB position. The alpha within one of the country’s top defenses this past fall, Rodriguez will immediately compete for snaps on Sunday. 

Losers

Jack Sanborn, Wisconsin

I expected more out of Jack Sanborn, who was gaining steam as a potential early-day-three pick. He failed to showcase anything above average for athletic traits in testing and looked stiff and uncomfortable at times in coverage drills. I’ll have an eye on him at Wisconsin’s Pro Day (March 9).

Mike Rose, Iowa State

Absent in Mobile despite an invite to the Senior Bowl, Mike Rose, a hybrid safety/linebacker was extremely underwhelming, especially in drills. I didn’t expect him to blow anyone away with his numbers in the 40 or in the vert, but accruing totals below average in the broad jump and skipping the 40 raised questions for me. He’s shown flashes on film but has a long way to go as a guy that could work as a rotational hybrid defender.