Senior Bowl EDGE Roster Primer: What You Need To Know

Photo: Stephen Lew-USA TODAY Sports

Senior Bowl EDGE Roster


A group of high-impact talent primed to light up the showcase event, the pool of edge prospects set to take the stage in Mobile for the Senior Bowl is an enticing one. 

With less than a week ‘till pads begin to crack during Senior Bowl practices, here is a deep dive into the deep group of edge threats to keep an eye on. We here at The Draft Network will have you covered from every angle starting next week on-site from the Senior Bowl.

Myjai Sanders, Cincinnati

One of the country’s most under-hyped prospects heading into Mobile, Myjai Sanders is a heck of a 5-tech who can flat out get after the quarterback. A quick-twitched defender with a pro-ready pass rush toolbox, a strong Senior Bowl could see Sanders’ stock rise significantly.

Cameron Thomas, San Diego State

A former defensive tackle turned edge rusher prior to the 2020 season, Cameron Thomas’ production draws you to his talent, but his elite versatility and sneaky athleticism along the defensive front present an awfully intriguing pro projection moving forward. A prospect who wins quickly with intelligent violence at the point of attack, his ability to work and jump inside/out around opposing linemen was ever apparent in his film this fall. He will shine in one-on-one drills against opposing tackles.

Jermaine Johnson, Florida State

You often hear the word “tools” thrown around when describing prospects, but Jermaine Johnson’s deep bag of exactly such has introduced a prospect, who at times, looked like one of the nation’s top defenders. An exceptional pass rusher with elite first-step quickness and a flexible lower half to both bend and overpower opposing linemen, Johnson is also an elite processor in the run game and is hard to move off his anchor when engaged.

DeAngelo Malone, Western Kentucky

In a t-shirt and shorts, DeAngelo Malone could very well be a top-10 pick. An impressively framed talent who should test very well, the former Hilltopper enters Mobile after years of production in Conference-USA. A smooth athlete off the edge, it doesn’t take long for Malone to wreak havoc. With a powerful lower half and excellent ability to transfer speed to power, Malone is a prospect defensive line coaches would have a field day with.

Logan Hall, Houston

A large man at 6-foot-6, while Logan Hall’s best days as a pro could come as an interior stalwart, his alignment versatility makes it nearly impossible to keep him away from the backfield. One of the biggest risers in the class, like Cougars’ alum Payton Turner last year, an eye-popping pre-draft circuit could see Hall hear his name called in the first round.

Dominique Robinson, Miami (OH)

An extremely raw prospect who’s just getting his feet wet on the defensive side of the ball, the former quarterback turned tight end has a long way to go in improving his technical ability off the edge. However, if teams are in search of a third-down pass-rush specialist to eat snaps as a depth developmental project, you can’t do much better than Dominique Robinson

Boye Mafe, Minnesota

Another talent whose skill set could fit best within an odd-front, Boye Mafe has consistently improved during his time as a Gopher. With film that popped off the screen at times due to his versatility, it will be difficult for defensive coordinators to keep him off the field with such a high motor to match to complement his impact as a true A and B level defender.

Tyreke Smith, Ohio State

A standout in Columbus the last few seasons, Tyreke Smith is a hybrid defender who would be able to rush from the inside/outside and has shown the ability to work out in space in coverage as well. Smith’s best football is down the road, but with a pro-ready frame at 6-foot-4 and 265 pounds, he presents the necessary alignment versatility to slide up and down the defensive line with juice at each spot.

Isaiah Thomas, Oklahoma

Often used as a sub-package pass-rush specialist during his time in Norman, if Isaiah Thomas is able to maintain his high motor when faced with increased work, his foundation as a prospect presents an awfully intriguing talent. He offers an ideal athletic profile to succeed out on the edge.

Arnold Ebiketie, Penn State

Speed, speed, and more speed. If Arnold Ebiketie is able to refine his game in the tighter areas of the LOS, he has the chance to become an every-down defender. For now, he’s a pass rush specialist.

Esezi Otomewo, Minnesota

Despite times where he would display excellent hand usage paired with a strong long arm to work around the edge, Esezi Otomewo has a ways to go—especially as a defender in the run, and in space. He will improve inside an NFL facility.

Josh Paschal, Kentucky

Josh Paschal’s tape was some of the more impressive of any draft-eligible edge defender in the class. As versatile as they come, Paschal is a high-character prospect who did not just align but succeeded at a multitude of spots. From lining as a wide-9 rusher to sliding inside to 3-tech, Paschal added to that versatility by also blocking a kick this fall. He does it all along the defensive front, and at a high level. 

Kingsley Enagbare, South Carolina

With similar measurables to that of Kwity Paye out of Michigan last year, Kingsley Enagbare presents an awfully impressive prospect whose best football remains down the road—a good sign. Long and powerfully built whose success in the SEC has seen his draft stock rise over the last few months, Enagbare’s fundamental traits as a pass rusher should see him enjoy immediate success on Sundays.

Michael Clemons, Texas A&M

A chiseled athlete, Michael Clemons is a bit of a lanky, gangly mover in space and is still figuring out exactly how and what to execute at the position. But he touts a high motor and his ability to stack and shed in the run game is pro-ready.

Amaré Barno, Virginia Tech

A former JUCO transfer who evolved into one of the ACC’s premier edge talents, Amare Barno’s length will present a ton of issues for opposing linemen who lack the ability to land their hands first in his chest plate. While he plays a little too upright for my liking—I would like to see more explosion in sitting heavier in his lower half—Barno has pterodactyl-like arms that make him awfully tough to grasp and control in the run game.

Written By:

Ryan Fowler

Staff Writer

Feature Writer for The Draft Network. Former Staff Writer for the Washington Football Team. Multiple years of coverage within the NFL and NBA.

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